Newsletter

December 2017 - The Holiday Issue

prime rib roast

As a child, my favorite holiday meals featured a beautiful standing rib roast. It was always an unforgettable occasion since we didn’t have one every year. With those happy memories in mind, I wanted to make this newsletter issue something special and share three different methods to prepare amazing prime rib roasts. We fired up the Hybrid Fire Grill, the Gaucho Grill and the Smoker Cabinet to create these recipes for you. I suggest serving your own prime rib roast with our resident Culinary Master Polly’s delicious Grill-roasted Turnip Gratin and some buttery mashed potatoes.

From all of us at Kalamazoo, we wish each and every one of you a safe and happy holiday season.

Cheers,


Smoked Prime Rib Roast with Bordelaise Sauce

Smoked Prime Rib Bordelaise Sauce

This wonderful dish combines a naturally tender and flavorful, primal cut of beef with that same smoky flavor that makes a brisket so delicious. The prime rib roast is smoked with oak wood for 4 1/2 hours and then browned beautifully on a hot grill. The smoke adds a subtle depth of flavor while  the “low and slow” method along with the “reverse sear” are fantastic techniques to achieve a perfectly cooked roast. We collected the drippings from the meat in a pan with some red wine and shallots while it was smoking.  Then we used them to make the smoky bordelaise sauce that really sends this roast over the top.

Ingredients

  • 1 4-bone prime rib roast or Choice grade standing rib roast, about 11 pounds
  • 2 tablespoons coarsely-ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups beef broth
  • 2 750ml bottles of “fruity” red wine
  • 2 large shallots, quartered and separated into layers
  • 3 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 foil roasting pan

Instructions

Prepare the smoker for 250°F smoking with oak wood for flavor. We recommend preheating the Kalamazoo Smoker Cabinet for 1 hour before putting in the food.

Trim the beef roast to leave very little external fat. A layer of fat on the outside of the beef will prevent the smoke from penetrating the meat. I suggest trimming to less than 1/8 inch thickness wherever possible.

Use a knife to lightly score a cross-hatch pattern on the outside of the roast. This scoring increases the surface area for better browning.

Coat the outside of the roast with the olive oil. Season liberally with salt and pepper, massaging it in with your hands. Let the beef rest while the smoker comes up to temperature.

Combine 1 bottle of red wine with the beef broth and shallots in the roasting pan.

If available, insert a smoker-compatible meat thermometer (the Kalamazoo Smoker Cabinet includes one with the pit computer) into the center of the roast through the side. Set the meat thermometer alarm to 120°F. You’ll be pulling the roast out of the smoker before it reaches medium rare so that you can finish it on the grill.

For the Kalamazoo Smoker Cabinet, remove the top shelf. Place the roasting pan on the bottom shelf, and set the beef on the shelf above the roasting pan. If your smoker does not have multiple shelves, place a roasting rack in the roasting pan, but make sure the beef is not touching the liquid in the pan.

 

Smoke the beef, maintaining moderate smoke, until the internal temperature reaches 120°F, about 4 1/2 hours.

As the roast nears its target temperature, prepare the grill for roasting (indirect grilling) at 500°F. Transfer the roast directly from the smoker to the indirect zone of the grill. Roast there, rotating once or twice, until the exterior is nicely browned and the internal temperature reaches 130°F for medium-rare. Remove from the grill and let rest on a carving board for 20 minutes before slicing.

Prepare the bordelaise sauce while the roast rests. Use a fine mesh colander to strain the drippings from the roasting pan into a large skillet. Add the second bottle of red wine and reduce over medium-high heat, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Once thickened, taste for flavor. Add the turbinado sugar one tablespoon at a time until the sauce is balanced to your liking. Whisk in the butter immediately before serving.

To carve the roast, begin by separating the rack of bones from the meat. I suggest leaving an inch of meat on the bones for serving. Slice the boneless meat to whatever thickness you desire, and cut the rack into individual bones. Transfer to a platter and drizzle with the smoky bordelaise sauce.

Note: If you would like to smoke the prime rib roast in the Hybrid Fire Grill, we have described a few methods in our Barbecue Techniques Grilling Guide. We recommend using our barbecue wood pellet adapters and following option one.


Charcoal Rotisserie Prime Rib with Horseradish Crust

Horseradish Crusted Prime Rib

I love using a live fire for roasting meats on the Hybrid Fire Grill rotisserie because of the incredible depth and quality of flavors not achievable through gas-fired rotisserie burners. We have a video to describe the method using a rotisserie with wood here, and another using charcoal here. In the case of this recipe, I used a charcoal fire for a more controllable heat and subtle flavor. The method is detailed within the recipe.

While I truly believe a prime rib roasted over a live fire is spectacular with nothing more than salt and pepper to season it, this intensely-flavorful horseradish crust makes it even better. Serve with slices of the lemon herb compound butter.

 

Ingredients

1 4-bone prime rib roast or Choice grade standing rib roast, about 11 pounds

For the horseradish crust

  • 1/3 cup prepared horseradish
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • 1/4 cup Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons coarsely-ground black pepper

 

For the lemon compound butter

  • 1/2 pound unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 3 tablespoons freshly-grated lemon zest
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • 2 tablespoons Maldon flaky sea salt

Instructions

Trim most of the external fat off the roast, leaving no more than 1/8 inch wherever possible. Use a knife to lightly score the exterior of the roast in a cross-hatch pattern. This increases the surface area for browning, the source of that delicious flavor.

Slide the roast onto your rotisserie spit, centering the meat as much as possible. Position the forks and tighten the thumbscrews using a pair of pliers.

Stir together all of the ingredients for the horseradish crust in a bowl. Massage the mixture into the surface of the meat, then let the roast rest at room temperature for an hour before cooking.

Prepare the grill for rotisserie roasting using a charcoal fire. For the Hybrid Fire Grill, flip up the warming rack onto its hooks to make way for the rotisserie. Remove the grill grates from the grill. Load the front 6 inches of the drawer with hardwood lump charcoal. (Of course, we recommend Kalamazoo Quebracho Charcoal for the longest burn times.) Offset the charcoal fire from the rotisserie spit in order to cook with indirect heat. Fire up the ignition burner, and then light all of the main burners. Preheat the grill and start the charcoal with all the main burners on HIGH. Once the fire is ready, it is time to start cooking the prime rib. Turn off the main burners, but leave the ignition burner on HIGH to help sustain the fire.

Mount the rotisserie spit into the grill and begin roasting with the hood closed. You can place a foil roasting pan in the drawer below the meat if you would like to collect the drippings. Target roasting temperature is 350°F. Please note that on the Hybrid Fire Grill, with the charcoal fire directly below the hood thermometer and the roast offset from there, the temperature on the hood thermometer should read approximately 425°F.

Roast the meat, maintaining the charcoal fire by adding a little extra charcoal as needed, until an instant-read meat thermometer registers 125°F for medium-rare. This should take 2 1/2 to 3 hours.

While the roast is cooking, combine the ingredients for the compound butter in a food processor. Pulse until thoroughly combined. Lay out a large square of plastic wrap and shape the butter into a log on top of it. Wrap tightly and refrigerate until serving.

Once the roast has reached its target temperature, remove it from the grill. Let it rest on a carving board, rotisserie-spit-and-all, for 20 minutes before carving.

To carve the roast, carefully remove the rotisserie spit, then begin by separating the rack of bones from the meat with a carving knife. I suggest leaving an inch of meat on the bones for serving. Slice the boneless meat to whatever thickness you desire, and cut the rack into individual bones. Place thin pats of butter over the sliced roast and allow to melt over the slices of meat.  

 

 


Wood-fired Prime Rib with Shallot Rosemary Crust

Wood-fired Prime Rib

The subtle smoke imparted by cooking over a live wood fire is complemented wonderfully by the sweetness of the caramelized shallot crust on this exceptional prime rib roast. I cooked this dish on the Kalamazoo Gaucho Grill, using the same offset fire setup as this video. You can also enjoy wood-fired rotisserie cooking in the Hybrid Fire Grill by following the method in this video.

Ingredients

1 4-bone prime rib roast or Choice grade standing rib roast, about 11 pounds

For the shallot rosemary crust

  • 3 large shallots, minced
  • 2 tablespoons freshly-grated lemon zest
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons coarsely-ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil.

Instructions

Trim most of the external fat off the roast, leaving no more than 1/8 inch wherever possible. Use a knife to lightly score the exterior of the roast in a cross-hatch pattern. This increases the surface area available for browning and the amount of delicious Maillard reaction.

Combine all of the ingredients for the crust in a bowl, then massage into the roast to coat it thoroughly. Let the roast rest at room temperature for about an hour.

Prepare the grill for wood-fired rotisserie cooking using indirect heat. For the Gaucho Grill, start with 6 large splits of wood laid out on the fire grate with each split placed vertically over both starter burners. To create an indirect cooking fire use a pair of protective grilling gloves and long tongs to move the burning wood so that it lines the front and back of the firebox.  Raise it higher to slow down the cooking, or lower it for faster browning as needed.

Slide the roast onto the rotisserie spit, centering the meat as much as possible. Position the forks and tighten the thumbscrews using a pair of pliers. Mount the spit into the grill and adjust the height of the roast from the fire so that it’s approximately 11 inches below the top of the grill. Cook until an instant-read meat thermometer registers 125°F for medium-rare. This should take about 2 1/2 hours.

Once the roast has reached its target temperature, remove it from the grill. Let it rest on a carving board, rotisserie-spit-and-all, for 20 minutes before carving.

To carve the roast, carefully remove the meat from the spit, then begin by separating the rack of bones from the meat with a carving knife. I suggest leaving an inch of meat on the bones for serving. Slice the boneless meat to whatever thickness you desire, and cut the rack into individual bones for serving.

 


Grill-roasted Turnip Gratin

Grill-roasted turnip gratin

This twist on the classic potato gratin is made with turnips, making for a light, delicate flavor. The top of the gratin turns a beautiful golden brown while roasting on the grill. The earthy flavors of fire and root vegetables meld beautifully with sweet caramelized leeks and a luscious blend of cheeses for a truly memorable take on this popular dish.

Ingredients

For the leeks

  • 3 leeks, white and light green parts only
  • 2 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • Pinch of salt

For the sauce

  • 1 ½ cup heavy cream
  • 4 large cloves of garlic, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

For assembly

  • 1 tablespoon butter, softened
  • 1 clove garlic, cut in half
  • 2 ½ pounds turnips
  • 3 oz Gruyere, shredded
  • 3 oz Parmigiano Reggiano, shredded

Instructions

Prepare the grill for indirect grilling with cooking temperature of 350°.

Before you chop the leeks, slice them lengthwise until you reach the core. Do not slice all the way through. You don’t want to cut the leek in half. Begin chopping the leeks crosswise about ¼-inch thick, creating long, thin strips when unraveled. Soak the leeks in a bowl of cold water for about five minutes to remove any dirt. Drain and set aside.

Since caramelizing onions can take a while, you may want to use a cooking oil with a higher smoke point so the onions don’t burn. I like to use a combination of vegetable oil and butter.

In a large skillet, heat the oil and butter over medium low heat (low if you’re using a Kalamazoo Cooktop) until the butter is melted. Stir in the leeks and salt. When the onions begin to soften, after about 5-7 minutes, stir and cover the skillet with a lid. Remove the lid every few minutes to stir. The leeks should be golden brown after about 20-30 minutes. Remove from heat and reserve.

Place all of the ingredients for the cream mixture in a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Make sure the cream does not reach a boil. Remove the saucepan from the heat and use an immersion blender to create a smooth mixture. Let the cream cool to room temp.

Peel the turnips and slice thinly, about ⅛ inch. I used a mandolin to speed up the process and ensure even thickness. Pat dry to remove some moisture and place turnip slices in a large mixing bowl.

Combine the two cheeses in a separate bowl and set aside.

Once the cream has cooled to room temperature, pour it over the turnip slices and mix with your hands ensuring each slice is coated with the mixture. Drain the turnips using a strainer and reserve the remaining cream.

In a 12-inch cast iron skillet, rub the cut garlic on the sides and bottom of the pan, then coat the pan  with the softened butter.

To begin assembling the gratin, take half of the turnips and begin overlapping the slices in a circular pattern to cover the bottom of the pan. Pour in half of the cream mixture, then sprinkle with half the caramelized onions and cheese. Repeat the layering process for the turnips, pouring in the remaining cream, and topping with the rest of the caramelized onions, then the rest of the cheese.

Place the skillet in the indirect zone of the grill and let the gratin bake with the hood closed for about 60-90 minutes. Rotate the skillet every 20 minutes to ensure even cooking and browning. The turnips are done when they can be easily pierced with a knife. Before serving, let cool for about 15 minutes to allow the sauce to thicken.

Innovation is at the heart of every Kalamazoo product. Each part of the collection – from grills and pizza ovens to refrigeration and cabinetry – represents a significant departure from the established norm. Our passion for outdoor cooking and our fiercely independent design philosophy drive us to establish new industry benchmarks. Consequently, our list of exclusives and innovations speaks for itself.